redistricting

WRAL

The leader of a North Carolina House committee considering changes to judicial election districts says updated boundaries based on outside feedback will be considered at the panel's next meeting, possibly next week.

WRAL

The North Carolina General Assembly reconvenes in two weeks, and some House Republicans keep working meanwhile to get proposed changes to judicial election districts on the agenda when colleagues return.

A House committee discussing redrawing voting districts for trial court judges and district attorneys holds its second meeting today at 1pm. A wholesale redraw hasn't occurred in more than 60 years. Republicans say redistricting would create fairer districts. Democrats argue it's a pretense for GOP gerrymandering.

With approval of new North Carolina legislative districts behind them, House Republicans returned Tuesday to Raleigh to advance their efforts to redraw election districts for trial court judges and local prosecutors.

WRAL

Democrats in the North Carolina General Assembly remain suspicious about an effort by Republicans to redraw election districts for trial court judges and local prosecutors.

A special House panel examining judicial redistricting met for the first time Tuesday, with a goal of passing proposed boundaries in time for the full chamber to consider them when the legislature reconvenes in early October.

Mapmakers are proposing new districts for most members of the North Carolina House, a move forced after federal judges ruled state Republicans illegally gave too much emphasis to race in the current version of legislative voting lines.

When you are carving up the state into new political districts, you don't do it willy-nilly. Especially when you have 28 state legislative seats ruled illegal racial gerrymanders and a federal court watching what you do.

Thursday, we learned just what criteria state lawmakers are going to use in this court ordered round of redistricting.

State lawmakers have started the process of implementing new political boundaries for the 2018 election, after federal judges invalidated 28 legislative districts for illegally gerrymandering black voters.

This week on the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the process, history, and political gamesmanship of redistricting.

This week in North Carolina politics, a conversation about redistricting, prosecutor layoffs, and a possible litigation ban at the UNC Center for Civil Rights.

Democrats in the State Senate are pushing for what they call fair redistricting. The legislature meets this month to redraw district maps.

The clock is now ticking, the deadline is set. Republican leaders of the General Assembly have one month to redraw 28 state legislative districts ruled to be illegal racial gerrymanders.

If they don’t, a court will.

It's been nearly eight weeks since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that 28 state legislative districts in North Carolina were illegal racial gerrymanders. The political maps, the court said, must be redrawn.  

On Wednesday, a select group of state senators and representatives sat down to officially begin that process.

On Wednesday, members of the General Assembly will begin complying with an order issued by the U.S. Supreme Court - fix 28 state legislative districts which the high court found to be illegal racial gerrymanders.

A select group of state senators and representatives will start that process when they meet to discuss redistricting.

WRAL

North Carolina Republicans introduced and advanced controversial legislation in the final days of session that would reshape district lines for judicial races across the state.

Corey Lowenstein/News & Observer of Raleigh

 An Associated Press analysis shows North Carolina's congressional and state House districts are among the most Republican-skewed in the country despite voter preferences that are relatively evenly split.

The AP calculated the partisan advantage for North Carolina Republicans in the 2016 state and federal House races through a new statistical tool that's designed to detect cases in which a political party maintained or increased its grip on power through how it drew voting districts.

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