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Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life. 

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Middle East
4:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Egypt's Economic Health Needs Outside Help

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Egypt's political future will largely depend on its economy, and its economic future will largely depend on help from other countries. To talk more about this, we reached Mohsin Khan. He's a senior fellow at the Rafik Hariri Center on the Middle East at the Atlantic Council. He's also the former Director of the Middle East Department at the International Monetary Fund. Good morning.

MOHSIN KHAN: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: What are Egypt's most immediate economic needs?

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Around the Nation
3:02 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Banjo Billy's Bus Tour: History, Mystery And Bad Jokes

The Banjo Billy bus tour starts and ends outside the Hotel Boulderado, at the corner of 13th and Spruce streets. Banjo shares some haunting tales from previous (and possibly still-current) guests, particularly those on the third floor and inside the still-functioning Otis elevator.
Courtesy of Vince Darcangelo

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:40 am

The rambling, funky ride called Banjo Billy's Bus Tours, in Boulder, Colo., is equal parts history, crime stories and comedy. It's all woven together by John Georgis — better known as Banjo Billy — in a playful, "choose your own adventure" style.

"You can either choose a PG tour, or a PG-13 tour, or an R-rated tour," he tells one group of riders. The crowd chooses the R-rated version, but they have to work for it.

"If you want the R-rated tour, you gotta say it like a pirate," Banjo says, drawing a bunch of "arrrrghs" from tour-goers. "R it is!"

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Environment
3:01 am
Wed July 10, 2013

In Montana Wilds, An Unlikely Alliance To Save The Sage Grouse

Bryan Ulring (left), ranch hand Graham Fulton (right) and Nature Conservancy ecologist Nathan Korb (center) install a pipe on a new well dug for the cattle Ulring manages for J Bar L Ranch. The ranch is working with The Nature Conservancy to try to preserve sage grouse habitat.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 1:46 pm

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Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Football Needs A Guardian, Not A CEO

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during a news conference at the NFL football spring meetings in Boston two months ago. Can he save our American sport from becoming a gladiator game?
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:03 am

Aaron Hernandez, who appears to be a monster, can no more be held up as representative of football than can Oscar Pistorius be fairly presented as an archetype of track and field.

But still, Hernandez does become a culminating figure. The sport is simply more and more identified with violence, both in its inherent nature and in its savage personnel.

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Around the Nation
8:17 am
Tue July 9, 2013

NTSB Investigators To Talk More To Cockpit Crew

For the latest developments in the investigation into the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, Renee Montagne talks to the head of the National Transportation Safety Board Deborah Hersman. Of the four pilots, investigators have only talked to two so far. More interviews will be conducted Tuesday.

Europe
7:28 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Mr. Darcy Statue Emerges From Hyde Park's Serpentine Lake

The 12-foot statue embodies the character played by Colin Firth in the BBC adaption of Pride and Prejudice. Brits recently ranked his spontaneous swim the most memorable TV drama moment.

Around the Nation
7:23 am
Tue July 9, 2013

The Family That Spits Together, Stays Together

The 40th Annual International Cherry Pit Spitting Championship was just held in Michigan. Matt Krause won when a pit flew nearly 42 feet. His brother Brian has won nine times, and his dad has won the title 15 times.

Author Interviews
6:44 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Comedian Aisha Tyler Talks About Flipping Off Failure

Tyler says as a kid she stood out because of her height, her glasses, and her vegetarian lunches.
Aisha Tyler

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:50 pm

Comedian and actor Aisha Tyler brews beer, plays video games, tells dirty jokes, drinks fancy booze and ... writes books.

She has a new one out this week: Self-inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humilation. We sat down in the NPR studios over a mug of 18-year-old scotch to talk about her most embarrassing moments on the road to success. (No, really, we did. Listen to us toast.)

For those of you wondering who Aisha Tyler is, here's a quick breakdown (to be read quickly):

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National Security
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Snowden's Leaks Puts National Security Agency In A Bind

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Larry just said, the Privacy Board can now openly debate NSA surveillance programs, thanks to the revelations from Edward Snowden. And this is just one example of how Snowden's leaks have put the NSA in a bind. To talk more about this we're joined by NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Carrie, thanks for coming in.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Thank you.

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National Security
5:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Privacy Board To Scrutinize Surveillance Programs

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:49 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Just after Edward Snowden first leaked secrets about government surveillance, he gave an interview to two journalists while he was hiding out in Hong Kong. Yesterday, The Guardian newspaper released more of that interview with Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras.

GREENE: In that video, Snowden discusses why he exposed the surveillance programs.

(SOUNDBITE OF INTERVIEW)

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