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Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life. 

Larry Goldstein is trying to find drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease. A biologist in cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego, Goldstein also just started testing something he hopes will enable paralyzed people to walk again.

For both lines of research, he's using cells from aborted fetuses.

"The fetal cells are vital at this time because, to our knowledge, they have the best properties for the kinds of experiments that we need to do," Goldstein says.

On the 18th floor of the Atlanta Financial Center, tech entrepreneurs recently pitched to potential investors over wine and brie.

John Duisberg, co-founder of Cooleaf, which makes a mobile app for employee engagement, tells the crowd he needs $500,000 to double the size of his company. It's got most of that money secured.

Two years ago, it was a different story.

Doctors To Get 70,000 New Medical Codes

Sep 29, 2015

Doctors are getting a billing system that's sure to cause headaches.

Introduced by the federal government, 70,000 new medical codes will describe diagnoses in detail.

Like this:

Crashed in a spacecraft? That's V95.41XA.

Walked into a lamppost? Twice? That's W220.2XD.

Others include, "Problems in relationship with in-laws..."

"Other contact with a squirrel ..."

And, "Underdosing of caffeine."

Not included: death via paperwork.

The New York Jets lost their game over the weekend. But they got some encouragement.

The singer Gladys Knight showed up late for the game. As soon as she did, the Jets scored.

And she later called into the weekly radio show of coach Todd Bowles. She says if the Jets make the Super Bowl, she will sing for him in person.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

From his first moments on air, new host Trevor Noah gave fans The Daily Show they have known and loved for years, with a few upgrades.

There were new graphics and a new desk, but the same old frat rock guitar music in the intro and the same show-closing Moment of Zen. Noah even began his hosting gig last night by talking about the guy he was succeeding, recently departed Daily Show host Jon Stewart.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit