Will Michaels

Will Michaels is a fan of news, sound and story. He started as an intern at WUNC when he was a student at the University of North Carolina. As a part of his internship, he worked for a semester on the daily national show, The Story with Dick Gordon. Will concentrated on radio while at college, studying under veteran NPR reporter Adam Hochberg. He began as a reporter for Carolina Connection, UNC's radio news magazine, and then became an anchor and managing editor for the program in 2009, when it was named the best college radio news program in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Will came back to WUNC in 2010 as the producer for Morning Edition for a couple of years, rising before the sun to help morning host Eric Hodge gather and present the news. In 2014, he produced WUNC's My Teacher series, part of the North Carolina Teacher Project. He is now a producer for The State of Things.

Makeba Wilbourn has been immersed in the subtleties of language since she was a child.

As the daughter of a northern white mother and southern black father, she constantly changed the way she spoke to her own family. And as she grew older, she realized she had to be an expert at code-switching in order to succeed as a biracial woman.

Today, Makeba studies how children develop those differences in language, and how that might contribute to our racial biases.

State lawmakers have filed a bipartisan bill to repeal House Bill 2 with some conditions.

The proposal got immediate backlash this week from other Democrats and LGBT rights groups who want a clean repeal of HB2, and it is not clear whether it has enough votes to pass.

Meanwhile, a committee in the state Senate has voted to issue a subpoena for Secretary of Military and Veterans Affairs Larry Hall after he failed to show up at three confirmation hearings.

Robi Damelin and Mazen Faraj lost a son and a father in the fighting between Israelis and Palestinians.

Instead of fighting back, they gave up revenge for reconciliation. They have resolved to use their pain to help others heal instead of instigate violence.

North Carolina Republicans could have a bigger role in the Trump administration's policies than they anticipated.

A report from the American Lung Association says North Carolina should do more to prevent and reduce tobacco use.

The group's annual "Tobacco Control Report Card" gave the state an "F" in every category it measures: funding for tobacco prevention and control programs, tobacco taxes, smoke-free air, access to cessation services, and laws that raise the smoking age to 21.

The Obama administration has released a five-year energy plan that blocks oil drilling off the North Carolina coast and the rest of eastern seaboard, as well as new drilling in parts of the Arctic.

Firefighters are entering a third week of battling more than a dozen wildfires in western North Carolina. 

The fires have been fueled by weeks of mostly sunny and dry conditions. 

The state chapter of the NAACP is asking a federal court to stop local elections boards from canceling voter registrations.

The lawsuit says the court should restore thousands of voters who have been removed from the rolls in Moore and Beaufort Counties because of individual challenges.

The two candidates in this year's race for attorney general have held highly influential positions in the General Assembly. 

Democrat Josh Stein is the former minority whip in the state Senate from Raleigh. He also served as an attorney in the state Justice Department.

Buck Newton is a current state Senator from Wilson who was instrumental in writing the language of the law known as HB2.

The Greensboro city council says state officials should revoke the law enforcement license and reconsider charges against a white police officer who violated the department's use-of-force policy in a confrontation with a black man.

The NCAA's decision to pull championship events out of North Carolina leaves a handful of cities without coveted college sports games, and the economic benefits that come with them.

Greensboro and Cary, in particular, expect to lose $14.6 million and $2 million in revenue, respectively.

The North Carolina Chamber is again denying any involvement with helping to write the controversial state law known as HB2.

"The North Carolina Chamber had no part in suggesting, drafting or reviewing House Bill 2 and anyone who suggests otherwise is misrepresenting the facts," the Chamber said in statement Thursday.

Gov. Pat McCrory has released a campaign ad that pushes back against the outcry over North Carolina's HB2.

Prosecutors in North Carolina and New Jersey are reopening the case of Felicia Reeves, a western North Carolina woman who was found dead in New Jersey last year.

Authorities originally concluded that Reeves had taken her own life in a motel room, but Reeves had claimed to be a police informant, raising questions about whether someone would have wanted her dead.

There is no evidence that police in New Jersey followed that lead during their investigation of Reeves' death.

In the late 1960s, Jacqueline Woodson and her family moved north from the segregated South to Brooklyn, New York.

It was a racially formative time and place that would later be known as the last wave of the Great Migration.

But at the time, Jacqueline simply knew Brooklyn as home. It was the place where she and her friends grew from children into adults, and shared the best and worst of a city that had become a vibrant destination for people of color.

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