Tom Bullock

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Over the weekend, the economic impact of House Bill 2 was at the heart of two very different calls to action. One voice called for Charlotte’s City Council to blink and repeal the LGBT ordinance passed earlier this year. The other called on North Carolinians to stand and fight House Bill 2.

Facts are often the first casualty in tough political races. They can be twisted and distorted to allow a candidate to claim a victory even one they don’t deserve.  

Governor Pat McCrory’s campaign had just such a moment this week. It has to do with House Bill 2, a drug company and a $20 million investment.

This story begins with a press release and a bland headline:

State Rep. Dan Bishop, R-Mecklenburg, was one of the lead sponsors of House Bill 2. He spoke to WFAE’s Tom Bullock about the Justice Department’s lawsuit against North Carolina, and why he believes it’s not discriminatory. “It’s not borne out of animus,” Bishop says.

The fight over House Bill 2 has moved from business boycotts and the court of public opinion to federal court.

On Monday, Governor Pat McCrory filed a federal suit against the U.S. Justice Department. The Republican leaders of the General Assembly filed their own suit against the DOJ shortly afterwards. In response, the DOJ filed its own suit against the state.

Updated 5:30 p.m.

The Justice Department has filed suit against North Carolina over House Bill 2. And North Carolina has filed not one but two lawsuits of its own against the Justice Department. WFAE's Tom Bullock joined All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey to break down the days's events.

North Carolina Republicans began gathering in Greensboro Friday for their 2016 State Convention.

These are normally events where people rally around candidates, platforms and their party. This year, in this state however, it was also a chance for party faithful to show defiance against the Federal Government.


This Friday and Saturday North Carolina Republicans will gather in Greensboro for their party’s state convention. With Wednesday’s news that Donald Trump is now the de facto Republican nominee we now know there will be no fight over delegates. But that doesn’t mean there won’t be some drama. Last week, the Republican Executive Committee ousted the party’s Chairman Hasan Harnett and elected Robin Hayes in his place. It’s been seen by some as the establishment striking back against a grass roots supported anti-establishment Chairman.

On May 4, WFAE’s Tom Bullock interviewed Hayes and has this report.


The U.S. Justice Department has determined North Carolina’s House Bill 2 violates the Federal Civil Rights Act by discriminating against transgender individuals. It’s given the state until close of business Monday to confirm "the state will not comply with or implement House Bill 2."

This Saturday, the North Carolina Republican Party will hold an unusual vote, whether or not to expel their current chairman.

"The economic repercussions are threatened and real." That was the first line of a press release from the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce put out Tuesday after PayPal ended plans to bring 400 jobs to Charlotte.

The move was in response to House Bill 2, which the company sees as discriminatory. For Charlotte, the loss of PayPal is tangible. But for North Carolina’s Republican lawmakers, the move has barely registered. And they’re now portraying PayPal as the kind of company nobody should deal with.

North Carolina voters are likely to be confused when they arrive at their polling places on March 15. In addition to presidential candidates, voters will see congressional primary candidates on the ballot.

But thanks to a federal court decision, the districts those candidates represent no longer exist and any votes in those races won't count.

Thanks to three judges, two animal shapes and one hastily redrawn map of U.S. House seats, North Carolina politics have been thrown into chaos.

Pages