Tom Bullock

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

The North Carolina treasurer’s race often gets overshadowed by other elections. But consider this, the treasurer runs a pension and health care system for state employees that is roughly four times the size of the state’s yearly budget.

WFAE’s Tom Bullock and Morning Edition host Marshall Terry break down the race for North Carolina treasurer.

Politicians love to brag about their endorsements. Those statements of support from other candidates, police or labor unions, newspapers, whatever.

On Friday, October 28th, Republican Governor Pat McCrory received an endorsement from a newspaper which, at first blush, sounds great for him. The endorsement starts with this question, “Which candidate would do the most to help our local economy?”

Economies of scale is a term well known in the business world. It means a way of saving money if you buy in bulk or better use what you already have.

It’s also a factor in politics.

And may be behind all the attention given two campaign messages sent out by conservatives this week about HB 2.

Consider for a moment this number, 66,636.

As of October 24, that is the number of political ads aired in North Carolina this election year. And just for state level races, think governor on down.

Now money in politics, that should not surprise you. But these numbers might. "The estimated cost of those ads is about $32 million." That’s Ben Weider from the Center for Public Integrity. The totals reached by poring through data primarily compiled by Kantar Media.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump made what amounts to a closing argument during Wednesday's visit to uptown Charlotte. It was an attempt to woo a group of voters who, so far, have largely not been in his camp.

Arguably the most influential race on your Election Day ballot is between two men you’ve never heard of. Bob Edmunds and Mike Morgan.

Edmunds is a Republican. Morgan a Democrat. And the victor will decide whether liberals take over or conservative hold their majority on North Carolina’s Supreme Court.

Tuesday night three men took the stage for the final North Carolina gubernatorial debate of 2016. And while Libertarian candidate Lon Cecil remained rather calm, Republican Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper got down right testy with each other. WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry with a recap and some fact checking.

Donald Trump made two campaign stops in North Carolina Friday. First a rally in Greensboro, then one 90 miles south here in Charlotte.

And despite a broken teleprompter at the Charlotte convention center, it can be argued the Republican presidential nominee stayed ‘on message’. He attacked the credibility of women who now say they were groped or forcibly kissed by Trump.  And he signaled, win or lose come November, Trump is unlikely to follow what has been a long held script in American presidential politics.

For an hour last night Republican Governor Pat McCrory and Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper attacked each other’s policies, priorities, and political records. The two men vying to be governor met for a debate just four weeks before Election Day. WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry now for a recap.

One week ago on September 20, CMPD officer Brentley Vinson shot and killed Keith Lamont Scott. WFAE’s David Boraks and Tom Bullock join All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey to talk us through what we know and still don’t know about the case.

This latest round of protests started peacefully. "It was all cool," said 31-year-old Eddie Thomas, "until riot cops came out. And once the riot cops came out, within five minutes, you had a man on the ground bleeding."

I’ll repeal mine if you repeal yours.

That’s the message North Carolina’s Republican leaders have been sending to the Charlotte City Council the past few days. The governor and legislative leaders have said they’re prepared to repeal House Bill 2 in full if, and only if, Charlotte votes to repeal its expanded non-discrimination ordinance first.

This morning Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts said no deal.

Political leaders, economic leaders – really, anyone with an opinion on House Bill 2 – will be paying close attention to Charlotte City Council Monday night to see if it will rescind its expansion to the city’s non-discrimination ordinance. 

There is a chance House Bill 2 could be repealed, in its entirety, next week.

That’s according to both Governor Pat McCrory’s office and a North Carolina lobbying group. But there are some major hurdles to overcome, the first comes on Monday night.

House Bill 2 was on the mind of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton  during a campaign stop Wednesday afternoon at UNC-Greensboro.

"I’m running for the LGBT teenager here in North Carolina, who sees your governor sign a bill legalizing discrimination, and suddenly feels like a second class citizen," Clinton said to applause.

Meanwhile, with this week’s announcement of college championship boycotts from both the NCAA and ACC still fresh, Governor Pat McCrory paid a visit to a group of Charlotte business leaders.

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