Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Serena Williams won her 21st Grand Slam title in a Wimbledon final against a much younger opponent, 21-year-old Garbine Muguruza of Spain.

For Williams, 33, it was her fourth Grand Slam championship in a row and her 25th career Grand Slam title match. It was Muguruza's first. Williams beat Muguruza 6-4, 6-4.

"Yeah, I'm having so much fun out here, you know, I just never dreamt I would be out here still and let alone winning," Williams told the crowd at Wimbledon after accepting her trophy.

Typhoon Chan-hom has come ashore just south of Shanghai, packing winds of up to 100 mph, forcing more than a million people to flee their homes and shutting down hundreds of flights at the region's airports.

Cham-hom is the second major storm to hit China this week, after Typhoon Linfa forced tens of thousands of people to evacuate in Guangdong province in the country's south.

China's official Xinhua news agency says no deaths or injuries from the storm have been reported so far.

At a ceremony marking the 20th anniversary of the massacre of Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica by Christian Serbs, the crowd turned its anger at the 1995 genocide against Serbia's prime minister, driving him from the event with rocks and bottles.

Sen. Ted Cruz's campaign tome, A Time for Truth: Reigniting the Miracle of America, has sold 11,854 copies. That should have been enough to earn it the No. 2 slot on The New York Times Best Seller List for hardcover nonfiction. But, instead comedian Aziz Ansari's Modern Romance occupies that spot.

Pope Francis normally receives all gifts with a polite thanks and smile. But the pontiff's reaction earlier this week when Bolivia's president gave him a crucifix in the shape of a communist hammer and sickle is open to interpretation.

Oil prices have further to fall before bottoming out amid a surge in production, mainly by OPEC nations, and a weakening of global demand, according to the International Energy Agency's latest forecast.

In the second quarter of 2015, the world's supply of oil was 96.39 million barrels a day, outstripping demand of 93.13 million barrels a day, according to the IEA's Oil Market Report, which described the world oil market as "massively oversupplied."

Volcanic ash spewing from Indonesia's Mount Raung has shut down airports and canceled flights on the resort island of Bali.

The volcano, located in East Java province, is about 95 miles west of Bali's international airport. The mountain began rumbling several weeks ago and on Friday began belching ash 12,000 feet into the air.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn says winds have blown the columns of smoke and ash southeast toward Bali and towns and villages near Mount Raung have been blanketed in ash since the volcano rumbled to life.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Army confirmed Thursday that it will cut 40,000 troops at several domestic bases over the next two years in a cost-saving move. If the White House and Congress are unable to avert another round of sequestration cuts, the troop reductions could be even deeper, according to Army officials.

The Obama administration's nominee to become the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff warns that Russia is the biggest threat to American interests and describes Moscow's recent geopolitical moves as "nothing short of alarming."

Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr., speaking at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, said: "Russia presents the greatest threat to our national security. ... If you look at their behavior, it's nothing short of alarming."

The U.S. has condemned a move by Thailand to deport more than 100 ethnic Uighur Muslims back to China amid fears that the refugees will be persecuted by Beijing authorities.

Michael Sullivan, reporting for NPR from Thailand, says the Uighurs fled China more than a year ago and were detained while Thai authorities tried to figure out what to do with them. About 170 were sent to Turkey last month, and the remainder were handed over to Chinese authorities today.

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