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Animals
8:10 pm
Fri May 8, 2015

In 'Rise Of Animals,' Sir David Attenborough Tells Story Of Vertebrates

Sir David Attenborough at the Beijing Museum of Natural History with fossil of Juramaia, as featured in the Smithsonian Channel series Rise of Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates.
Courtesy Smithsonian Channel

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 1:23 pm

Famed British broadcaster and naturalist Sir David Attenborough has been lending his calming voice to nature documentaries ever since TV was in black and white.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
5:47 am
Wed May 6, 2015

6 Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White'

Jamaal Allan is a teacher in Des Moines, Iowa. His name has taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.
Courtesy of Jamaal Allan

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 2:09 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, in which thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

People make a lot of assumptions based on a name alone.

Jamaal Allan, a high school teacher in Des Moines, Iowa, should know. To the surprise of many who have only seen his name, Allan is white. And that's taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.

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The 'Morning Edition' Book Club
10:56 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Join The 'Morning Edition' Book Club As We Read 'A God In Ruins'

A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson is May's Morning Edition book club selection. We'll talk with Atkinson on June 16. Read along with us, and send us your questions and comments about the book. (Book guide by Veronica Erb/NPR)
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 12:17 pm

Welcome to the second session of the Morning Edition book club! Here's how it works: A well-known writer will pick a book he or she loved. We'll all read it. Then, you'll send us your questions about the book. About a month later, we'll reconvene to talk about the book with the author and the writer who picked it.

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Music Interviews
6:33 am
Tue May 5, 2015

Willie Nelson: 'Ain't Many Of Us Left'

In his new memoir, It's A Long Story, Willie Nelson writes about his early career as a DJ in Fort Worth. He can still recite what he'd say on the air.
David McClister Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 9:14 am

The first thing you notice when you get on Willie Nelson's tour bus is a pungent aroma. Parked outside a gigantic casino and performance venue in Thackerville, Okla., Nelson offers NPR's David Greene a joint, which Greene declines. Nelson says he understands.

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Photography
3:22 am
Mon May 4, 2015

A Landscape Of Abundance Becomes A Landscape Of Scarcity

Courtesy of Matt Black

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 11:44 am

Photographer Matt Black grew up in California's Central Valley. He has dedicated his life to documenting the area's small towns and farmers.

Last year, he says he realized what had been a mild drought was now severe. It had simply stopped raining.

"It was kind of a daily surreal thing to walk outside," Black says.

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All Tech Considered
6:52 pm
Sun May 3, 2015

The Promise And Potential Pitfalls Of Apple's ResearchKit

ResearchKit, presented by Apple's Jeff Williams in March, enables app creation to aid medical research.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 9:37 am

Most of the tech buzz these days has centered on the new Apple Watch — including on the potential for health-related apps. Less attention has been given to Apple's ResearchKit, an open-source mobile software platform released in March.

But the medical world is paying attention.

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Asia
10:11 am
Sun May 3, 2015

Nepal's Medical Worries: Crowded Hospitals, Open Wounds

Hospital staff members work at the reception area of a hospital in Kathmandu. Some 14,000 were injured in Nepal's earthquake.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 2:09 pm

An estimated 14,000 were injured in April's earthquake in Nepal. The caseload is overwhelming hospitals in Kathmandu, says Dr. Bianca Grecu-Jacobs, a resident in emergency medicine from California who was working in Nepal when the quake struck.

"[In] the lobby areas, patients just are on the floor waiting," Grecu-Jacobs says via Skype from Katmandu. "They strung up IVs for patients who need them in whatever manner they can."

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Author Interviews
2:40 pm
Sat May 2, 2015

A Veteran Scientist Dreams Boldly Of 'Earth And Sky'

Originally published on Sat May 2, 2015 10:26 am

Freeman Dyson is one of the most famous names in science, and sometimes one of the most controversial. Dyson is 91 and was one of the British scientists who helped win World War II. He spent most years since as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. He has won the Max Planck Medal and the Templeton Prize, and written important, oft-quoted books including Disturbing the Universe and The Scientist as Rebel, and newspaper articles that inspire both admiration and debate.

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Book News & Features
7:53 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Graphic Novel About Holocaust 'Maus' Banned In Russia For Its Cover

Cartoonist Art Spiegelman attends the French Institute Alliance Francaise's "After Charlie: What's Next for Art, Satire and Censorship" at Florence Gould Hall on Feb. 19 in New York City.
Mark Sagliocco Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 12:17 pm

Art Spiegelman's Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel about the Holocaust, Maus, has some very memorable cover art. It pictures a pair of mice — representing Jews — huddling beneath a cat-like caricature of Adolf Hitler. Behind the feline Hitler is a large swastika.

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Author Interviews
3:49 am
Tue April 28, 2015

'Ashley's War' Details Vital Work Of Female Soldiers In Afghanistan

First Lt. Ashley White was one of some 55 to 60 women selected for cultural support teams that deployed to Afghanistan in 2011. She did not make it home. She was the first woman to die and be honored alongside the Army Rangers with whom she served.
Courtesy of the White Family

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 5:56 pm

The Pentagon says women could be eligible for all combat roles in the military by next year, but some women already have been fighting — and dying — for their country. They're serving right alongside elite special operations units, such as the Navy SEALs or Army Rangers.

It's part of an effort to connect with half of the Afghan population that was off-limits to male soldiers: the women. Some military leaders considered reaching them one of the keys to winning the war.

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