NPR Staff

Seeking sanctuary in a church is an ancient tradition. But it's been making modern headlines — some immigrants enter churches to find refuge from deportation.

Rosa Robles Loreto was among them. She migrated from her hometown in northern Mexico to Tucson 16 years ago, and stayed illegally after her visa expired. Since then she has worked as a maid, raising two sons, and found a community in her children's Little League team.

It was a secret rescue operation in Aleppo, Syria — a mission to save a family who, to protect their identity, are being called the Halabis.

They were reportedly the last Jews living in Syria's largest city. Miriam Halabi's son, in Brooklyn, asked a businessman to help get them out.

So the Halabis — 88-year-old Miriam, two daughters, a son-in-law and three children — embarked on a dangerous journey.

They hoped to find refuge in Israel, and Miriam Halabi and her daughter Sara were able to get visas.

Days of speculation and anxiety followed the Paris attacks. Then, last week, the Paris prosecutor's office confirmed that two of the suicide bombers did pass through Greece last month as part of the wave of refugees fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East and Africa.

In the U.S., the emotional debate about whether or not to shut Syrian refugees out altogether gained new traction in presidential politics.

In a run-down stretch of Chicago's South Michigan Avenue, miles from the museums and skyscrapers, an army of foot-high paving stones stand on shelves along the street. It's a handmade memorial to honor the young people who have died at the hands of the city's street violence. A name is written on each of the 574 stones.

But they are not just names to Diane Latiker.

It's common wisdom that families should avoid talking about politics around the Thanksgiving table.

But if you're reading this, you might be in an NPR family. And coming up on election year — with polls and gaffes every day — won't it be hard to talk about Car Talk the whole night?

So we turned to Miss Manners, aka writer Judith Martin, to ensure our etiquette's up-to-date this holiday season.

For Martin, the age-old rule, "don't talk politics," still stands.

When the idea to write a Nordic cookbook landed on Magnus Nilsson's desk, he was against it. He says it was offensive that someone would think all of Nordic cuisine could fit, let alone belong, in one book.

"The Nordic is a geographical region, not really a cultural region," says the author, who's also head chef at the Michelin-starred Faviken restaurant, 400 miles north of Stockholm. "It's too big, and too varied." (It includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden and several groups of autonomous islands.)

He eventually came around.

For those who like to try new recipes at Thanksgiving, let Clay Dunn and Zach Patton be your guides. They're the couple behind the food blog, The Bitten Word, and every year before the holiday, they scan 10 leading food magazines to identify recipe trends.

In 1977, an 18-year-old Peter "Stoney" Emshwiller filmed himself asking questions meant for his future self. Emshwiller tells NPR's Ari Shapiro, "I was going through what I think a lot of 18-year-olds go through — where you're leaving high school and you're about to start sort of your real life — and felt like I wanted to ask somebody who knows. And of course there isn't anybody, but I decided to pretend there was and sit down and talk to a blank wall asking every question I could think of and responding to every answer I thought I might get back."

Each morning for the past decade, StoryCorps has been presenting interviews recorded in booths. But this year, StoryCorps created a smartphone app that gives anyone — even if they can't get to a booth — the ability to interview someone and save that recorded interview at the Library of Congress.

These interviews can be recorded anywhere, even in the parking lot of an Applebee's. That's where Kara Masteller sat with her grandfather, James Kennicott, and talked about life and love in Waterloo, Iowa — in Masteller's 1994 Buick.

The upcoming Thanksgiving holiday is generally celebrated with a bounty of food — and a mountain of leftovers, some of which, let's face it, will end up in the trash.