Michael Tomsic

Michael Tomsic became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Heââ

A three-judge panel in Raleigh will hear arguments Thursday between North Carolina's new Democratic governor and its entrenched Republican legislature over the separation of powers. Governor Roy Cooper is suing lawmakers over a bill they passed in special session after he had won but before he took office. Senate Bill 4 changes the partisan makeup of the State Board of Elections, and gives lawmakers more control over it. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry for analysis.

A Wake County judge has put a law on hold that would change the balance of power on state and county election boards. Governor-elect Roy Cooper sued Republican lawmakers over that law, which they passed in special session two weeks ago.

North Carolina’s General Assembly is in a special session Wednesday discussing whether to repeal House Bill 2, the controversial state law that restricted LGBT protections. The repeal effort was thrown into question after reports surfaced that the Charlotte City Council left some portions of its ordinance that started this fight intact. There's been a lot of confusion around what city council did, so here's a primer.

Charlotte City Council voted unanimously Monday to repeal LGBT protections the city adopted in February. Council members say they've come around to a deal Republican state leaders have been offering to get rid of House Bill 2, which invalidated Charlotte's protections anyway.

Update on Dec. 19

Republican Gov. Pat McCrory signed Senate Bill 4 into law. He said in a press release, “This legislation lays important groundwork to ensure a fair and ethical election process in North Carolina." It passed the state House and Senate along party lines. 

Original post on Dec. 15

As the U.S. Supreme Court works toward a ruling on how North Carolina redrew its voting districts, a state senator from Mecklenburg County is continuing his call for independent redistricting. Democratic Sen. Jeff Jackson said the current process results in almost no competitive races.

The U.S. Supreme Court is considering the distinction between race and politics in North Carolina's redistricting process. The nation's highest court heard arguments Monday in a case that struck down two of North Carolina's congressional districts. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Mark Rumsey for analysis of the arguments.

Racial gerrymandering in North Carolina will be the focus of arguments today before the U.S. Supreme Court. The short-staffed court is reviewing a lower court ruling that struck down how North Carolina redrew its congressional districts in 2011.

The head of the Obamacare exchanges is encouraging consumers to continue signing up for health insurance even though Republicans are promising to repeal the law. The CEO of healthcare.gov acknowledges he can't guarantee there won't be changes in coverage.

In the North Carolina legislature, Republicans maintained their supermajority in both the House and Senate. That means regardless of who's governor, lawmakers can override him.

Health care in the United States has gone through major changes during the Obama administration. President-elect Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress will soon have the power to flip all that. WFAE's Michael Tomsic reports on what that may mean in North Carolina.  

A federal judge late Friday ordered North Carolina to reinstate thousands of voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been covering the case and joined Nick de la Canal for analysis.

A federal judge has ordered North Carolina to reinstate roughly 3,500 voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state.

A federal judge in Winston-Salem Wednesday said the state's process for handling challenges to a voter's registration "sounds like something that was put together in 1901." Judge Loretta Biggs had pointed questions about the cancellation of nearly 7,000 voter registrations in eight counties over the past two years. The North Carolina NAACP is suing North Carolina, and much of the focus is on recent cancellations in Cumberland and Moore counties. WFAE's Michael Tomsic was in the courtroom and joined Mark Rumsey to discuss.

What stood out?

A federal judge in Winston-Salem will hear arguments Wednesday over the recent cancellations of up to 4,500 voter registrations. The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP alleges some of those cancellations targeted African-Americans, and all of them violate federal law. The North Carolina Board of Elections calls that a legal misinterpretation that puts registration policies in most states in jeopardy. Either way, advances in technology have changed the way these cancellations happen.

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