Michael Tomsic

Michael Tomsic became a full-time reporter for WFAE in August 2012. Before that, he reported for the station as a freelancer and intern while he finished his senior year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Heââ

Doctors in North Carolina are feeling the effects of certain national health care trends but bucking others. The Physicians Foundation's 2016 survey shows high burnout but lower hospital consolidation in North Carolina.

The independent watchdog within the Department of Veterans Affairs reports the Salisbury VA manipulated wait times and amassed a huge backlog of radiology exams.

In Charlotte on Tuesday, First Lady Michelle Obama emphasized how competitive North Carolina has been in the last two presidential elections. She used that message to rally supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

The Charlotte police officer who fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott last week has a short personal history with CMPD but a long family one. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been researching officer Brentley Vinson, who, like Scott, is African-American. He joined Mark Rumsey to discuss what we know.

Some uptown businesses are cleaning up Thursday afternoon. That’s after rioters smashed windows and threw trash cans during the second night of anger over the fatal police shooting of an African-American man.

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why. 

Supporters of LGBT protections in Charlotte showed their appreciation for something the city council did not do Monday night. They clapped loudly for city leaders who said they wouldn’t walk back their nondiscrimination ordinance as part of a deal with state leaders in Raleigh.

African-American turnout, partisan politics and the threat of more lawsuits were all on the minds of North Carolina Board of Elections members yesterday. They set the final early voting plans for 33 counties that couldn’t reach their own agreement, including Mecklenburg.

In the swing state of North Carolina, a fight for early voting rights that seemed to end with a strongly worded federal court ruling last month, may be just getting started.

That fight began in 2013, when the state made cuts to early voting, created a photo ID requirement and eliminated same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and pre-registration of high school students.

More than half of all voters there use early voting, and African-Americans do so at higher rates than whites. African-Americans also tend to overwhelmingly vote for Democrats.

Federal health leaders are promoting a form of contraception that's effective for years and essentially forget-proof.

They're encouraging state Medicaid programs to increase access to intrauterine devices and arm implants, both of which are more effective than the birth control pill. South Carolina as a whole and one North Carolina county are ahead of the curve on this.

The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected North Carolina's request to reinstate its voting overhaul this November.

It's not a final ruling in the case. But for this election, it means North Carolina can't use a variety of Republican changes a federal appeals court found were passed with discriminatory intent.

The Obama administration is touting a new argument for why states like North Carolina should expand Medicaid. Federal researchers found in states that already have, the premiums people pay on the Obamacare exchanges are lower.

The North Carolina NAACP, the League of Women Voters and others are asking the U.S. Supreme Court not to reinstate major voting changes in North Carolina. They filed their response Thursday to Governor Pat McCrory's request to put aside an appeals court decision.

Charlotte City Council members approved new body armor and more community training for CMPD last night. They also got updates on the streetcar, the airport and the NBA All-Star game. We’ll get to those in a minute. But first, the votes involving CMPD and the frustration many at the meeting expressed about police treatment of African-Americans.

Federal courts have struck down voting laws in North Carolina and several other states recently. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has this national roundup.