John Henning Schumann

John Henning Schumann, M.D., is an internal medicine physician and writer (http://glasshospital.com). He has contributed to Slate, The Atlantic, Marketplace, and National Public Radio’s health blog, Shots.

Schumann serves as guest host for Studio Tulsa on health-related themes and is also host of Medical Matters on KWGS, an occasional series about health care and the human condition.

He was appointed Interim President of the University of Oklahoma – Tulsa in January 2015. You can find him on twitter @GlassHospital.

People might be forgiven for thinking that the Affordable Care Act is the federal government's boldest intrusion into the private business of health care. But few know about a 70-year-old law that is responsible for the construction of much of our health system's infrastructure. The law's latest anniversary came and went without much notice in August. The Hill-Burton Act was signed into law by President Harry S. Truman on August 13, 1946 — and its effect on health care in the U.S. was nothing...

For years, Mrs. Sutton came to see me in the office every three months. Visiting the doctor quarterly was "the right thing to do," she told me, given the fact that she had both diabetes and high blood pressure. She always set the agenda at our visits. She brought lists of questions and requests that followed the recommendations of her fellow churchgoers and the health materials she had read. It came as no surprise to me when she asked to undergo a colonoscopy at age 68, in order to be...

If you follow health news, by now you may have heard about a federally funded study that was stopped early because of impressive evidence that aggressively lowering blood pressure saves lives. For more than half a century we've known that controlling blood pressure ( getting the numbers below 140/90) is important in preventing heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure. The so-called SPRINT study that was just stopped tells us that lowering the systolic blood pressure (the top number) to 120...

Beware the mention of natural causes, as in my mother's obituary: "Norita Wyse Berman, a writer, stockbroker and artist ... died at home Friday of natural causes. She was 60." Sixty-year-olds don't die of natural causes anymore. The truth was too hard to admit. Fifteen years on, I'm ashamed of my family's shame. Those attending her funeral and paying shiva calls knew the truth anyway. People talk. One of the many ironies of dying young is that my mother was a true believer in modern medicine....

Famed doctor and medical educator William Osler once said, "A physician who treats himself has a fool for a patient." What, I wonder, does that say about us doctors who treat our own kids? This past winter, my daughter got the flu. She was miserable: daily fevers, achiness, sore throat, stuffy head and nausea with a total loss of appetite. We didn't run a flu test on her, which you can do with a quick nasal swab at a doctor's office. Since my wife and I are both docs, we were comfortable that...

Oscar buzz surrounds Julianne Moore for her role as Alice Howland in the film Still Alice . Howland is a linguistics professor who develops early-onset Alzheimer's, a cruel irony for a character who makes her living with her brain. Howland's awareness of her fate makes her decline all the more painful to watch. Often, though, patients and their doctors can be slow to recognize dementia , which most often progresses gradually. Patients can be all over the spectrum...

The holidays are here, bringing joy and, for some, wistful feelings. Doctors are no different. Even for a profession that prides itself on scientific proof, the long nights of December afford ample opportunity for reflection and even doubt. As we take stock of what we've accomplished and where we've failed to measure up, I find my scowling mask of medical skepticism falling away. I have to admit that there is so much wonder and mystery that science and medicine still can't explain. Take...

Maybe you've heard about the slow food movement. Maybe you're a devotee. The idea is that cooking, nutrition and eating should be intentional, mindful and substantive. Avoid fast food and highly processed grub. For the slow food set, the process is as important as the product. Now I'm seeing a medical version of slow food. The concept is bubbling up in response to industrialized, hypertechnological and often unnecessary medical care that drives up costs and leaves both doctors and patients...

Back in 2003 I was a junior doctor working at a Chicago teaching hospital. As one of the newer docs, my daily appointment schedule had lots of openings. Pretty much any assignment nobody else wanted came my way. One morning the nurse who managed our clinic told me that my first patient for the afternoon may have been exposed to a deadly virus while he was traveling in Asia. My job would be to dress up in a medical hazmat suit, examine him and figure out whether he should be quarantined. I...

Executions in this country often draw controversy. But when the headlines about them include words like botched or bungled, the debate about capital punishment enters new territory. In Oklahoma, where I practice medicine, Clayton Lockett was convicted of murdering Stephanie Nieman, who had just graduated from high school, in 1999. Testimony revealed that Lockett bound her hands and mouth with duct tape, shot her twice and buried her alive in a roadside grave. He was convicted of first degree...

I pulled back the curtain, ready to meet the next patient on my hospital rounds. "Why are you standing there?" she asked me. "Come, have a seat, let's talk." Lenore could have been my grandmother. She was 77 years old, and all of 93 pounds. What she lacked in girth, she more than made up for in chutzpah. She was one of the patients from intern year who I'll never forget. After four years of medical school, I could recite biochemical pathways, genetic mutations and the ways all sorts of drugs...

December is supposed to be the time of year filled with family gatherings and holiday good cheer. For medical residents, quite the opposite is true. There are no school breaks during residency. Being a medical resident is a real job, and a stressful one at that. Residents work long shifts , even with caps that max out at 16 hours for the newbies and up to 28 hours for those beyond the first year. For many of our trainees — especially those fresh out of medical school — this will be the first...

A 40-something patient I'll call Ted has a list of conditions that would have tongue-tied Carl Sagan. Even though I see Ted in my clinic every month, he still winds up visiting the emergency room 20 times per year. Yes, 20. Before he became my patient, he went even more frequently. So, the current situation, bad as it may be, represents halting progress. Inside the hospital, Ted is what's known as a frequent flier, a patient we see over and over again. Unlike airlines, hospitals don't offer...

Debate is raging about Obamacare, and not just in Washington. Out here in Oklahoma we're grappling with implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Patients. Employers. Hospitals. Doctors. Insurers. All of us. Here then are one doctor's predictions about what we will see in the short and medium term for what I see as the unfolding Obamacare era — the biggest domestic health expansion since the enactment of Medicare in 1965. 1. Obamacare is moving ahead, Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz...

I became a doctor to help people. When I was a medical student, I held the naive and idealistic belief that if I just did good work, the business side of things would somehow take care of itself. How wrong I was. Now I'm an internist taking care of all comers age 18 and up. Some days I find myself facing patients and feeling more like a harried airline clerk than a real doctor. I carry a laptop in and out of each exam room, fretting about entering all sorts of data to document the work I do....

Pages