Jeff Tiberii

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs


RALEIGH, N.C. — A deal to undo House Bill 2 fell apart Wednesday night when legislators couldn't agree on a plan to the repeal the measure, a sign of the bitter political divide within the state.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

After an acrimonious day that led to protests and arrests, lawmakers are likely to give final approval Friday to bills that would remove executive powers.

On Thursday, hundreds of protesters gathered at the N.C. General Assembly to voice their opposition to these Republican policy proposals and chanted in unison, "Shame! Shame! Shame! Shame! Forward together, not one step back!"

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A wild day at the North Carolina General Assembly began with bipartisan support for a $200 million disaster relief bill and ended with an unscheduled special session, dozens of new bills, and an effort to remove some authority from Democratic Governor-elect Roy Cooper.

In a chaotic scene of political theater, Republicans flexed their legislative muscles and proposed a series of provisions that would remove certain powers from the Executive Branch, including the Secretary of State and Governor. 

State lawmakers will convene in Raleigh Tuesday to deal with disaster relief, but the agenda is open-ended.

Lame duck Republican Governor Pat McCrory called this gathering to deal with disaster relief stemming from Hurricane Matthew and mountain wildfires in western North Carolina, as well as “for the purpose of addressing any other matters the General Assembly elects to consider.”

Durham election officials have been ordered to do a machine recount on more than 90,000 ballots after technical challenges on election night. Late Thursday, the State Board of Elections gave Durham a Monday deadline to complete that recount.

North Carolina's State Board of Elections has ordered Durham County to recount tens of thousands of ballots cast during early voting, reversing the decision of the county board a couple of weeks ago.

Republican incumbent Pat McCrory trails Democrat Roy Cooper by more than 6,100 votes in the ongoing race for North Carolina's governor.

In the two weeks since Election Day, McCrory’s campaign has called for all provisional and absentee ballots to be counted, while raising dozens of claims of voter fraud. As more votes have been tabulated, Cooper’s lead has increased.

The protracted gubernatorial race continues across North Carolina. Counties face a deadline to certify local results by the end of the day. Some will do just that, but many others will need an extension into next week to finalize vote counts. And in Durham, an evidentiary hearing takes place to determine if paper ballots should be recounted, following a computer glitch.

The 2016 election cycle has been strange, unorthodox, offensive, entertaining, unpredictable, divisive and long.

For more than a year, strategists have tried to use scandals, wedge issues and the media, among other political tools, as candidates chase victory on Election Night. But now, it all comes down to numbers. Here are a few to consider in the final stretch of the campaign.

Millions of North Carolinians will cast ballots this election – and millions will not. With the cacophony of attack ads, character assaults and ambiguous policy positions at a fevered pitch, perhaps the most important political question these days – will you vote?

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, host Jeff Tiberii talks with Jason deBruyn, WUNC’s data reporter, about the races in play - and the potential balance of power - in the North Carolina General Assembly (and Jason's strong sock game).

With early voting set to begin, North Carolina residents got another side-by-side look of Governor Pat McCrory and Attorney General Roy Cooper Tuesday night. The two sparred – along with Libertarian Lon Cecil - over a range of topics in their final scheduled gubernatorial debate.

North Carolina voters will help to determine the balance of power in the United States Senate next month. Republican Incumbent Richard Burr is seeking a third, which he says will be his final. Democrat Deborah Ross has provided a tougher than expected challenge.

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