Frank Stasio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

Comedian Jordan Carlos has never shied away from politics in his stand-up material, whether it is jokes about the ways African-Americans respond to mass shootings or the influence of President Trump’s Twitter activity. 

President Trump continues to receive criticism after his remarks earlier this week about violence that took place last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Nearly 20 percent of residents in Greensboro live in poverty, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. A new series by WUNC reporter Naomi Prioleau examines the specific barriers these individuals face as they try to change their economic future.

Clark Whittington never set out to secure a spot in a famous art museum. The Winston-Salem artist instead dreamed of creating art for the masses. 20 years ago he repurposed old cigarette vending machines to sell and distribute pocket-sized black-and-white photographs.


When Heather Victoria decided to transfer to North Carolina Central University in 2009, she didn’t know she’d soon team up to make music with hip-hop scholar and Grammy-winning producer Patrick Douthit, also known as 9th Wonder

In the past five years, 51 inmates in county jails across the state have died after poor supervision from jailers, according to a report by The News & Observer. 

Every summer a group of teenagers pitch, report, write and produce radio stories as a part of WUNC’s Youth Reporting Institute. The young reporters pick stories that illuminate aspects of their community. 

In 2014, tens of thousands of families fled Central America to the U.S. in an attempt to escape gang violence. Since that period, asylum requests in the U.S. have increased, but asylum approvals are declining.

As tension persists in the Trump administration, former Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly stepped in last week as President Donald Trump’s chief of staff. 

Singer-songwriter Steven Diaz allows the natural world to both sooth and inspire him. Under the name Mountain Lions, Diaz creates intimate and introspective songs that reflect familiar people and places. In his debut EP “Calm Wind, Starry Night,” Diaz explores motifs of nature and personal identity. 

The comedy “Girls Trip” is a standout success from this summer’s blockbuster season. The movie is about four best friends who take a wild and raunchy trip to New Orleans, and since its release last month, it has faired well with both audiences and critics. Meanwhile rapper Jay-Z released his highly-anticipated album “4:44” at the end of June. 

In 1975 thousands of women from across the world gathered in Mexico City to discuss the state of the feminist movement. The U.N. had declared 1975 “International Women’s Year,” and a governmental conference in Mexico City served as the capstone event. 

Meanwhile, an NGO tribune took place in the city at the same time and drew some of the key leaders in feminism like Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem. The tribune and governmental conference also included women from poorer countries whose views of feminism were often at odds with their American counterparts.

Last month a chemical compound found in the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA) water supply caught the attention of local officials. The contaminant GenX is manufactured by the Chemours Company at its Fayetteville Works plant. It is a replacement for a hazardous ingredient in Teflon.

State lawmakers are considering another voter ID bill that would be brought to voters as a constitutional amendment. In 2013 lawmakers passed a voter ID measure that was deemed unconstitutional last year by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals . 

In his new novel “The Reason You’re Alive” (HarperCollins/2017), writer Matthew Quick tells the story of an aging Vietnam veteran grappling with civilian life.

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