Frank Stasio

Longtime NPR correspondent Frank Stasio was named permanent host of The State of Things in June 2006. A native of Buffalo, Frank has been in radio since the age of 19. He began his public radio career at WOI in Ames, Iowa, where he was a magazine show anchor and the station's News Director.

From there he went to National Public Radio, where he rose from associate producer to newscaster for All Things Considered. He left that job in 1990 to help start an alternative school in Washington, DC. Frank returned to NPR as a freelance news anchor, guest host of Talk of The Nation and other national programs, and host of special news coverage.

He also presents audio theater workshops for children and teachers and conducts radio journalism workshops for broadcasters in former Soviet-bloc countries. He lives in Durham.

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

Learning To Cope With Extreme Narcissism

Nov 27, 2015

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

Note: This is a rebroadcast from earlier this year.

A K-12 charter school in Rutherford County is under fire from the North Carolina American Civil Liberties Union after the school suspended all student club activities earlier this month.

N.C. Political Roundup

Nov 24, 2015

The United States House of Representatives passed a bill last week to restrict Syrian and Iraqi refugees admission to the United States until more stringent security measures are in place.

During World War II, approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans were forced into internment camps across the country. About 2,000 internees came from Hawai'i, including George Hoshida and his family.

Lowland Hum spent the majority of last year touring on the road, but by the end, the married indie folk duo or Daniel and Lauren Goans couldn't wait to get home and start writing again. They described moments of isolation and moments of beauty from the sights around the United States.

Lizz Winstead has made a career being the watchdog of the watchdog. As a co-creator of The Daily Show in the 1990s, Winstead was one of the first comedians satirizing both newsmakers and news media.

Raleigh-based poet Gibbons Ruark has been traveling to Ireland for more than 35 years. Along the way, he has walked the same paths as the country's literary greats like W.B. Yeats and Seamus Heaney.

In the wake of terrorist attacks in Paris, President Obama announced the United States will accept 10,000 Syrian refugees in the coming year, an increase from the 1,854 Syrian refugees admitted since 2012.