Anita Rao

Anita Rao is a producer for The State of Things, WUNC's daily, live talk show that features the issues, personalities and places of North Carolina. She fell in love with interviewing and storytelling as a Women's Studies and International Studies major at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and began her radio career at WUNC as an intern for the nationally distributed public radio program The Story. From 2011 - 2014, she worked for the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps Production department, where she pitched, edited and produced conversations from across the nation--from Chicago, IL to Pineville, North Carolina.  

Anita was born in a small coal-mining town in Northeast England but spent most of her life growing up in Iowa and has a fond affection for the Midwest. She loves excessively-long dinner parties and hopes to one day live up to her mom's nickname, "Sheila, The Chocolate Eater."

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

From Hot To Salty, Smoky And Sweet, What Our State’s Flavors Say About Who We Are

Nam, a dish of sour pork sausage, rice, and deep-fried crunch sticky rice is one of the more traditional Lao dishes available at Asian Fusion Kitchen in Morganton. Laotian food in NC is one of many topics to be discussed at "The State of The Plate."
Katy Clune

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 10:19 am

Hot, salty/smoky, sour/bitter, sweet, savory, and sharp: a flavor profile can evoke a particular style of food, and in turn, food can give insight to a community’s public health, history and policies. This week, students, faculty, entrepreneurs and community members at UNC-Chapel Hill gather to explore the history, politics and culture of North Carolina food using the six flavor profiles as a guide.

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NPR Story
12:08 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Confronting The Legacies Of Violence

A photo from Grenada, Miss., where Nan Elizabeth Woodruff studies the legacies of terror and violence against people of color.

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 4:20 pm

  This year marks the 50th anniversary of many monumental moments of the civil rights movement.

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NPR Story
12:11 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Redistricting Controversy

Two controversial redistricting bills passed last week in the Senate are headed for debate on the House floor. One proposes recongifuring the Greensboro City Council.
Wikipedia Commons

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:25 pm

Two controversial redistricting bills passed last week in the Senate are headed for debate on the House floor. 

Senate Bill 181, introduced by Republican Chad Barefoot of Wake County, modifies the boundaries for Wake County Commissioner Seats. Senate Bill 36, introduced by Republican Trudy Wade of Guilford County, reconfigures the Greensboro City Council to a seven-member body in which the mayor has no voting power.  Both bills raise questions about the role of state lawmakers in controlling local governing bodies. 

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NPR Story
12:06 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

John Prine: In Spite of Himself

John Prine is a singer and songwriter with a career spanning more than four decades. A new biography "John Prine: In Spite of Himself" documents Prine's music, life and legacy.
Oh Boy Records & Jim Shea

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:27 pm

Legendary singer-songwriter John Prine is best known for writing "Angel from Montgomery," "Sam Stone," and "Paradise." 

His musical career began humbly in the late 1960s while he was still working as a mailman in Illinois. Five decades later, Prine is a Nashville icon who has won a litany of awards, including two Grammys and a lifetime achievement award for songwriting from the Americana Music Association

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NPR Story
12:49 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Are We Our Minds?

Split-brain studies have illuminated how the brain functions and raised bigger philosophical questions like: what is a mind, and what would it mean to have two minds?

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 3:37 pm

Cognitive neuropsychology is a branch of psychology that uses brain damage or atypical brains to theorize about the structure of the mind.

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NPR Story
12:43 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Teen Author Explores An Alternate Reality

Hannah Clementine is the author of the new book "Nothing But Your Memories."

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 3:36 pm

    

Hannah Clementine started writing when she was just nine years old. She recently published her first novel after winning the 2013 BookLogix Young Writers Contest. 

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NPR Story
12:53 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

A New Take On Nature Versus Nurture

Ken Dodge's research has been following the same group of children for more than 20 years.

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 4:26 pm

    

There is a common metaphor in the scientific community that uses flowers to describe children’s sensitivity to their environments.

A child like a dandelion will turn out fine despite the circumstances she is raised in, while a child like an orchid will flounder without a nourishing environment, but blossom with care and support.

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Guns And The Civil Rights Movement

A new book by Charles E. Cobb Jr. that explores the role of guns in the civil rights movement.

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 3:29 pm

    

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of key moments in the civil rights movement, including Bloody Sunday and the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

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NPR Story
12:34 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Turning An Old Idea Into A New Phenomenon

The participants in ARAPDIS find mental health therapy in the garden, sharing and observing the daily green delights.
Photo by Barcelona-based photographer Violeta de Lama, courtesy of Wil Weldon.

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 1:32 pm

More and more people around the world are choosing to get their hands dirty—digging in the dirt in their backyard or at a community garden to plant produce.

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NPR Story
12:25 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Bringing Back Radio Haiti, A Station That Told The Overlooked Stories

Some of the tapes from the Radio Haiti archive now housed at Duke University's Rubenstein Library.
Laura Wagner/ The Radio Haiti Archive

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 12:26 pm

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