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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Michael Brown's Parents File Civil Suit Against Ferguson And Former Officer

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:34 pm

The parents of Michael Brown, the unarmed man whom a Ferguson, Mo., police officer shot and killed last August, have filed a civil lawsuit against the city, along with former police chief Thomas Jackson and Darren Wilson, the now-former officer who shot Brown, 18.

The lawsuit was filed by Michael Brown Sr. and Lesley McSpadden at the St. Louis County Courthouse Thursday morning. It says Wilson "unjustifiably shot and killed" Brown, using "an unnecessary and unreasonable" amount of force.

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Shots - Health News
5:08 am
Thu April 23, 2015

More Whistleblowers Say Health Plans Are Gouging Medicare

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:41 pm

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years.

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Europe
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

U.N. Representative Blames Syria's Civil War For Massive Migration Crisis

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Early 'Breakfast Club' Script Found At Chicago High School

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Secret Papers Reveal Islamic State's Structure

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Politics
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Congressional Battle Brews Over Bill To Extend NSA Data Collection

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 2:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

A Black Eye, A Middle Finger And Other Tales From A White House Press Secretary

Courtesy of Hachette Book Group

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:23 am

Being a White House press secretary sometimes requires taking a black eye or two for your boss — in this case, the president of the United States. Dana Perino learned that lesson the hard way. She served at the end of President George W. Bush's second term, and she's out with a new book, And The Good News Is ..., about her life and her time at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

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Around the Nation
4:25 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why

Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 2:25 pm

A magnitude-3.0 earthquake is small, but most people can feel it. Historically, Oklahoma got less than two of those a year, but in 2013 it became two a week.

It's only gotten more active since then — last year, the state had three times as many earthquakes as in the entire seismically active state of California.

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The Salt
4:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Fruit Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage

A cherry tree and its blossoms are covered with snow in an orchard near Traverse City, Mich. Three years ago, almost every fruit crop in Michigan was frozen out when cold temperatures followed some 80 degree days in March.
John L. Russell AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Fruit growers in northern Michigan grow apples, peaches and wine grapes. But the big crop here is tart cherries.

More than half of Ken Engle's 140-acre farm is planted with what he calls sour cherries.

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U.S.
4:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Some Companies Fight Pay Gap By Eliminating Salary Negotiations

Women stage a protest demanding equal pay for women at a 2012 rally in Miami.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 10:56 am

When it comes to negotiating salaries, the research is pretty clear: women are less assertive than men. It's one reason women who start their careers with a narrower pay gap see it widen over time.

Carnegie Mellon economics professor Linda Babcock, who studies the gender pay gap, says men are four times more likely to negotiate their pay. That keeps women at a disadvantage, though they're not always aware of it.

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