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Voters and legislators are constantly confronted with decisions that would benefit from some understanding of the relevant science:

Is cap and trade a good approach to controlling greenhouse gas emissions? Evaluating the pros and cons requires some understanding of economics and environmental science. Are standardized tests a good way to measure student learning? An informed answer requires some understanding of education and human psychology.

It is one of the great ironies of biology that sometimes breakthroughs seem to come when it is supposed that its problems have less to do with the body, which is pulsing, hot, and wet, and more to do with information processing, which is dry and computational.

To give an example, vision is widely believed to be the process of extracting information about an environment from an image. There is nothing distinctively biological about this. A machine can do it, in principle at least.

Sometimes it takes a Sunday morning to see how much damage was done Saturday night.

So it was this weekend, in New Hampshire and in the broader national conversation about the 2016 presidential race.

On Saturday night, many observers seized on the meatiest moment from the GOP debate staged here — perhaps the most salient moment of all the debates so far. It was the clash between Chris Christie and Marco Rubio that turned into a stunning exposé of Rubio's technique.

At midnight Tuesday the residents of tiny Dixville Notch, N.H., will welcome camera crews for the quadrennial ritual of casting the first votes in the nation's first presidential primary.

The remote town near the Canadian border is so small that it has only a roomful of registered voters and zero racial diversity. Its votes in recent cycles have been unreliable indicators of who will win the primary.

But the cameras will be there, nonetheless, because it is first, and because it is a tradition.

A federal appellate court declared North Carolina's 1st and 12th Congressional Districts unconstitutional because they were gerrymandered on race. The court ordered legislators to redraw the districts within two weeks.

For Stefan Litwin, playing the piano is personal. Litwin was born in Mexico City in 1960 after his parents fled from the Nazis in Europe years earlier.

Tweeting an image of football cleats hanging on a wire and one emoji — of a peace sign — was all running back Marshawn Lynch needed to do to get people thinking that he's retiring from football. Lynch, whose reticence regarding the media is legendary, was quickly saluted by his Seattle Seahawks teammates.

The Seahawks haven't officially said Lynch is retiring, and it's highly unlikely that he would hold a news conference to make his plans known and to banter with reporters about his favorite moments in the NFL.

After an airplane passenger set off a bomb last week, the pilot managed to land the plane safely in Mogadishu, Somalia. Now CCTV footage released by the Somali government indicates airport workers may have been in on the attack.

The only casualty of the attack was the bomber, who apparently was sucked out of the hole in the side of the plane.

NPR's Gregory Warner tells our Newscast unit that the bomber was originally scheduled to fly on a Turkish Airlines flight. Here's more from Gregory:

On the southwestern tip of the Korean Peninsula, laid out across ferry-filled harbors and rolling hillsides, is a vibrant port city called Mokpo.

Famous for its Japanese colonial architecture and for being the jumping-off point to scenic islands like Heuksan and Jeju— the "Hawaii of Korea" — Mokpo is also known for its fishing industry and its local seafood delicacy: hongeo.

Only a few people survived when a boat carrying migrants capsized in the Aegean Sea on Monday, Turkish Coast Guard officials say. More than two dozen people perished — including about a dozen children.

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