NPR News

Pages

Parallels
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

American's Death Still A Greek Mystery, 65 Years Later

CBS correspondent George Polk and his wife, Rea, in 1948, shortly before his murder on May 8 of that year in Greece.
Megaloeconomou AP

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

George Polk may have been born to make history. He was descended from the American president who led the conquest of Texas and much of the Southwest. But for George Polk, Texas was too small, says his brother William.

In the 1930s, "Texas was a little backwater at the time, and very few people even knew where other countries were — what the names were, what the languages were that were spoken," William Polk says. "And he had a tremendous sense of curiosity."

Read more
Code Switch
6:01 am
Sun October 27, 2013

N.Y. Chinatown Family Finds Roots In Early Chinese Cinema

Harold Lee's son Henry, perched on the roof of a camera truck, helped produce and import Chinese-language films from Hong Kong and China in the late 1940s.
Courtesy of the Lee Family

Douglas Lee thought he knew just about everything about the family business.

Since the late 1930s, the Lee family has sold insurance at 31 Pell Street in New York City's Chinatown. Their entrepreneurial roots in the Chinese-American community stretch back to 1888, when the Lees opened a grocery store at the same location.

Read more
Music Interviews
7:05 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

For 'All Is Lost,' A Songwriter Embraces Silence

Alexander Ebert is best known for his band Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, a folk band with a dozen members. His latest project is the score for All Is Lost, a film about one man lost at sea.
Stewart Cole Courtesy of the artist

Alexander Ebert may be best known as the singer and songwriter of Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros — a band named for his messianic alter ego — which produced the addictive and catchy song "Home" in 2009.

He has also enjoyed a successful career as a solo artist since releasing his self-titled debut album in 2011.

Read more
Law
5:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Lacking Lethal Injection Drugs, States Find Untested Backups

States across the country are facing a shortage of the drugs used for lethal injections. Some are going from a three-drug cocktail to a single drug.
Amber Hunt AP

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 7:32 pm

The U.S. is facing a shortage of a drug widely used for lethal injections. With few options, states are turning to new drugs and compounding pharmacies, rather than overseas companies.

The move is raising safety concerns, and in some cases delaying executions. Other executions are proceeding, however, and advocates are asking whether the use of new drugs violates the inmates' Eighth Amendment protection from cruel and unusual punishment.

A Witness To Lethal Injection

Read more
The New And The Next
5:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

A Teenage Music Phenom, Infographics, Motorcycles In Vietnam

Ozy co-founder Carlos Watson talks about a teen singer with a grown-up voice and Harleys in Vietnam.
Courtesy of Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 9:45 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Drawing Rock 'N' Roll And Sympathy Into Frankenstein's World

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 8:01 pm

Mary Shelley's 1818 novel Frankenstein has been adapted countless times over the years — into films, television shows and even musicals.

In his new graphic novel adaptation of Shelley's story, illustrator Gris Grimly says he set out to make the original text more accessible.

"The first time I tried to read Frankenstein, I didn't get through it," Grimly tells NPR's Arun Rath. "Frankenstein is not the easiest read when you're young."

Read more
Code Switch
5:12 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Photographing Puerto Rican New York, With A 'Sympathetic Eye'

Miguel Piñero of the Nuyorican literary movement and poet Sandra Maria Esteves on the train in New York City in 1977.
Bolivar Arellano

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 9:31 pm

In the raging 1970s, New York City was dangerous, broke and at times on fire.

Latinos in the city were taking to the streets, running for office and carving out artistic spaces. "Latino" at the time in New York meant "Puerto Rican."

Read more
The Two-Way
5:00 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

World Series Game 3: Lineups Shift For Games In St. Louis

Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz, a designated hitter in American League ballparks, played first base in St. Louis during the 2004 World Series. He'll do the same for Game 3 of the series Saturday.
Al Bello Getty Images

The all-tied World Series resumes tonight, with Game 3 between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Boston Red Sox. Ahead of the game Saturday, the main storyline centers on the change of venue to St. Louis, where the Red Sox, and their pitchers, will have to adapt to National League rules.

The shift gives the Cardinals something of an edge, at least for now, as NPR's Tom Goldman reports for our Newscast unit:

Read more
It's All Politics
3:39 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

PR Experts: Obamacare Message (Not Just The Site) Needs Fix

A woman looks at the HealthCare.gov insurance exchange site on Oct. 1 in Washington, D.C.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

There's little doubt that the Obama administration would like a health care website do-over.

Since its rollout Oct. 1, Obamacare's online insurance exchange sign-up, critical to success of the health care overhaul, has been a well-documented disaster.

The White House, in addition to managing considerable political fallout, also is dealing with a big, fat public relations problem. Just how does the administration go about winning the trust of the American people after the October Obamacare debacle?

Read more
The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Marcia Wallace, Longtime 'Simpsons' Cast Member, Dies At 70

Actress Marcia Wallace has died at age 70. She was a fixture on American television for decades, thanks to long-running roles on The Bob Newhart Show and The Simpsons.
Angela Weiss Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 8:46 pm

The woman behind Edna Krabappel and Carol Kester has died. Actress Marcia Wallace, who is known to generations of TV fans for distinctly different roles on The Bob Newhart Show and The Simpsons, was 70 years old.

Read more

Pages