Earlier this week, police shot and killed Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C., sparking days of protests and conflicting accounts of the moment that led to his death. Amid the demonstrations, one chant in particular rippled through the crowds: "Release the tapes."

Now, the Charlotte Police Department have announced they plan to do just that.

The New York Times editorial board endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Saturday, saying their reasoning was "rooted in respect for her intellect, experience and courage."

"The best case for Hillary Clinton cannot be, and is not, that she isn't Donald Trump," the board wrote, before citing its reasons why Clinton is better suited to the presidency than her opponent.

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.

In President Obama's remarks at the dedication ceremony, he said this museum shines a light on stories that are often overlooked in the history books.

By day, Philip Vignola Jr. works in technology at Research Triangle Park. In his spare time, he likes to roam the streets of downtown Durham and showcase the city’s history and beauty.

Instagram: @bullcitypictures

Duke Energy and state environmental regulators have settled a dispute over the size of a state fine over a coal ash spill near Duke's Dan River plant in Eden in February 2014.  

Duke agreed to pay $6 million for violations of the federal Clean Water Act during and after the spill in February 2014.

The police killing of Keith Scott on Tuesday and nightly protests since then have hit Charlotte’s black community hard. People are dealing with anger, fear and concern about the community’s long-term challenges.

WFAE reporter David Boraks went to a press conference on North Tryon Street with black business owners Friday afternoon. The event was organized by Shaun Corbett, whom some people may know as the leader of a group called Cops & Barbers.

Boraks talked with All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.  Listen to their conversation here. 


Updated 1 p.m.

Hundreds of people marched through uptown Charlotte for a fourth night Friday, chanting "release the tapes" to protest Tuesday's police killing of Keith Scott.


Police said Saturday afternoon they arrested 11 people, including nine for violating the city's midnight to 6 a.m. curfew. Police allowed the demonstrations to go on past midnight, but began enforcing the curfew around 2 a.m.  A man and a woman were charged with a break-in as well.  

There were no injuries and police said they did not use tear gas, as they have during other protests this week.  

Congress had just one thing to do this month before it left town for its October recess. That was to keep the government funded past Sept. 30. But with just under one week left on what was supposed to be a straightforward task, there's still no deal in sight.

Droughts, floods and heat waves are becoming more common in various parts of the world thanks to climate change.

Beyond the immediate devastation those natural disasters can cause, experts say they’re also exacerbating public health problems, from promoting the spread of mosquito-borne diseases like Zika to sowing famine and malnutrition.

Pictures of polar bears paddling long distances for food among thinning sea ice were some of the first galvanizing images of the environmental movement to do something about climate change.

But nearly every species on Earth is affected by global warming, from coyotes who find themselves in closer contact with humans due to a shifting habitat to migratory birds adjusting to unfamiliar ecosystems and weather patterns.

The third night of protests in Charlotte, North Carolina, was peaceful. But pressure is mounting on the city to release a video showing the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.

On Friday afternoon, WFAE aired an hour long special discussing the video released by Keith Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott.

Joining Mark Rumsey were WFAE reporters Tom Bullock and Gwendolyn Glenn and Charlotte School of Law professor Jason Huber. Included in the special were interviews with former Charlotte police chief Darrel Stephens, Charlotte city councilwoman Vi Lyles, and Stephen N. Xenakis, M.D. Brigadier General (Ret), retired general and Army psychiatrist.

As officials in Charlotte, N.C., consider when, if, and how to release video of the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott earlier this week, lawyers for the family have released what they say is eyewitness video taken by Scott's wife.

When Harry Selker was working as a cardiologist in the 1970s, clot-busting drugs were showing great promise against heart attacks. But their life-saving properties were very time sensitive. "If you give it within the first hour it has a 47 percent reduction of mortality; if you wait another hour, it has a 28 percent reduction; another hour, 23 percent. And people were taking about 90 minutes to make that decision," he recalls. "So they were losing the opportunity to save patients' lives."

The academic and athletic scandal at the University of North Carolina dominated headlines for years.

Allegations of paper classes and inappropriate assistance to student-athletes prompted internal and external investigations. And newly released correspondence shows what was going on behind-the-scenes in the midst of revelations about academic fraud. 

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