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NPR Story
5:07 am
Tue April 21, 2015

Immigrants Flee South Africa After Xenophobic Attacks

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:07 am
Tue April 21, 2015

Ariz. Sheriff Who's Tough On Illegal Immigration Faces Contempt Hearing

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:07 am
Tue April 21, 2015

3D Printers Are Changing The Way People Think About Manufacturing

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:07 am
Tue April 21, 2015

Palm Oil Plantations Are Blamed For Many Evils. But Change Is Coming

A forest worker fells palm trees on an illegal palm oil plantation in Aceh Province, Indonesia.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Palm oil is in everything, from pizza dough and chocolate to laundry detergent and lipstick. Non-governmental organizations blame it for contributing to assorted evils, from global warming to human rights abuses.

But in the past year, this complex global industry has changed, as consumers put pressure on producers to show that they're not destroying forests, killing rare animals, grabbing land or exploiting workers.

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Your Money
5:07 am
Tue April 21, 2015

Proposed Retirement Advice Rule Has Worrisome Loopholes, Experts Say

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Religion
3:58 am
Tue April 21, 2015

Construction Of Giant Telescope In Hawaii Draws Natives' Ire

Native Hawaiians dance in honor of Mauna Kea at the base of Pu'u Huluhulu on the Big Island.
Molly Solomon NPR

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:07 am

In Hawaii, a battle is going on over the future of a mountaintop. Native Hawaiians say it's sacred ground, while astronomers say it's the best place in the world to build a massive, 18-story telescope.

This is not simply a story of religion versus science. Activists consider the construction of a giant telescope on the island of Hawaii to be a desecration of their sacred land.

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U.S.
3:57 am
Tue April 21, 2015

Solar Power Makes Electricity More Accessible On Navajo Reservation

This solar panel unit cost about $17,000, less than half as much as it costs to extend the electrical grid a mile. Homeowner Leo Thompson pays the power company $75 a month to maintain and service the unit.
Ibby Caputo NPR

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:07 am

Most people can't imagine living without smartphones or the Internet, let alone without electricity. But even today — even in the United States — there are still people who live without lights and refrigeration. Many are Native Americans living on tribal reservations.

For many, electricity is a luxury; it can even be magical. Derrick Terry remembers the first winter when there were lights on at his grandmother's house.

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Shots - Health News
3:56 am
Tue April 21, 2015

What's At Stake If Supreme Court Eliminates Your Obamacare Subsidy

Carlton Scott pays $266.99 per month for his subsidized health insurance plan. He worries he and his neighbors would lose their insurance without the subsidy.
Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:07 am

The Affordable Care Act requires all Americans to get health insurance or pay a penalty. To help coax people to buy a health plan, the federal government now subsidizes premiums for millions of Americans.

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Back At Base
3:54 am
Tue April 21, 2015

National Guard Seeks New Mission After War

The Army spent $300 million to upgrade Camp Atterbury and the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center — seen here in this aerial photo from 2012 — for Indiana's National Guard to use to prepare for the wars and Iraq and Afghanistan. But now that troops are coming home, the Guard is looking for new ways to keep the base relevant.
Sgt. Ashley Reed Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 5:07 am

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the first of four reports this week about the National Guard.

The Army spent billions of dollars getting the National Guard ready for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But now that the money has been spent and troops are coming home, there are questions about the Guard's mission.

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The Two-Way
9:03 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Norway Becoming First Country To Eliminate FM Radio

Norway is moving on from analog radios in 2017.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 8:27 pm

Normay is going to eliminate FM radio in less than two years, the country's government announced, becoming the first country in the world to do so.

Norway is planning to transition completely to digital broadcasting in January 2017.

The Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) system offers a number of benefits over FM, said Thorhild Widvey, Norway's minister of culture, in a statement last week.

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