News

Corporal Punishment, a Dying Practice in NC Schools

Apr 26, 2016

The use of corporal punishment as discipline in North Carolina schools is now practiced in just three counties.  Child advocacy groups are urging them to end it, saying that it does more harm than good. Davin Eldridge has more.

wral.com

A federal judge is dismissing lawsuits challenging a North Carolina election law that requires voters to show photo identification when casting ballots.

U.S. District Judge Thomas Schroeder's ruling Monday leaves in place the state law that requires those voting in person to show an accepted type of photo ID, eliminates same-day registration, and ends out-of-precinct voting.

The Smoky Mountain Brass Band is celebrating its 35th Anniversary this year and will perform Saturday at Asheville Community Theatre in a joint concert with the Cary, NC Triangle Brass Band. Listen at 1:06 when Dick Kowal talks with members of the band about their history and their upcoming program.

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

McKinley Morrison, an early education teacher at Asheville's Verner Center for Early Learning, is leaving her job and the state of North Carolina, citing House Bill 2 as a major reason for her departure.  Morrison, who was born biologically male and identifies as "trans-feminine" said the bill made her feel "not wanted."

Tune in Saturday at 3 for We'll Be Here All Night: Stories for Passover - a Passover special from Table Magazine's National Magazine Award-winning podcast, Vox Tablet. The special features funny, poignant, and thought-provoking stories and conversations that touch on the plagues, on slavery, on food, on the act of story-telling and more. The special is hosted by Sara Ivry and Jonathan Goldstein, with stories from Etgar Keret, Sally Herships, Debbie Nathan, Michael Twitty, and Jonathan Groubert.

Kristofer Thompson

Listen Tuesday morning at 10 for a concert by The Knights. The Brooklyn-based orchestra collective performed in February at Asheville's Diana Wortham Theatre in concert presented by Free Range Asheville. It was recorded by WCQS and Tuesday morning is your chance to hear it and be a part of the excitement generated by this group of young virtuosos. On the program, a suite from Run Rabbit Run by Sufjan Stevens arranged for The Knights by principal horn Michael P.

Maddy Jones/Asheville Citizen-Times

The North Carolina Forest Service says two large wildfires burning in the mountains are mostly contained.  Kerry Lathrop in the Region 3 command center tells WCQS a 1,050 acre blaze in Madison County along the North Carolina/Tennessee line is about 80 percent contained.  A 243 acre fire burning in Macon County called the Buck Knob fire is said to be 100 percent contained.  Drier conditions have helped contribute to the fires.  Rain is in the forecast Friday for western North Carolina.

Roomful of Teeth on WCQS

Apr 21, 2016
BONICA AYALA OF BONICA AYALA PHOTOGRAPHY

  The Grammy winning vocal ensemble Roomful of Teeth performs Thursday evening, April 28, in downtown Asheville's Masonic Temple in a concert presented by Free Range Asheville. They will also perform live in our studios that Thursday afternoon at 2.

Listen today at 1:06 when Dick Kowal talks with two members of Roomful of Teeth, founder Brad Wells and tenor Eric Dudley.

Pianist Elizabeth Child talked with Dick Kowal about her upcoming recital at the Asheville Art Museum. There's music by Bach, Beethoven, Debussy, and Tryon resident Rita Landrum. Elizabeth received her doctorate from The Juilliard School, but later left music. Later, she moved to Tryon and returned to her playing and teaching, "more herself."

NBC News

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory appeared on NBC's Meet the Press on Sunday to defend House Bill 2.  The controversial law has drawn wide condemnation in the corporate world, boycotts from artists, and travel bans from elected officials.  McCrory signed the bill hours after passage during a one-day special session to overturn a Charlotte ordinance that, among other things, allowed transgender people to use the restroom matching their gender identity.  But HB2 went far beyond, banning cities and towns from adopting their own non-discrimination ordinances, excluding LGBT protections in a s

Steve Harrison/Charlotte Observer

In an interview with WCQS, Tami Fitzgerald, Executive Director of the North Carolina Values Coalition, said opposition to House Bill 2 is the result of a smear campaign perpetrated by LGBT "bullies."  She took direct aim at the national gay rights group Human Rights Campaign and the state group Equality North Carolina, claiming the groups are misleading companies and threatening them if they don't come out against the bill.  She says the law is a common sense protection against men going into women's restrooms and locker rooms.  When asked whether she was open to any amendments of the law,

Harry Lynch, News & Observer of Raleigh

North Carolina lawmakers will convene later this month for their short session and House Bill 2 is expected to figure prominently.  The bill barring anti-discrimination measures for the LGBT community was passed in a one-day special session.  Hundreds of people rallied today in the state capital in support of HB2, despite a backlash from the political and corporate world that’s gone nationwide.  This weekend we learned one of the most prominent members of the opposition will now be an insider arguing for its repeal.  Chris Sgro, Executive Director of gay rights group Equality North Carolin

Tune in Tuesday morning at 10 and Thursday night at 8 for the broadcast of the Asheville Symphony Orchestra's March concert, "Romeo & Juliet".  The concert featured Elgar's "Chanson de Matin and Chanson de Nuit", Mozart's "Piano Concerto No. 21," featuring guest pianist Shen Lu. The program concludes with Berlioz's "Romeo and Juliet."

Gerry Broome/Associated Press

A series of hearings across the state are giving the public the opportunity to weigh in on coal ash disposal, and policymakers are getting an earful.  Residents have brought up numerous concerns, and some have suggested current health issues could be a result of water contamination from coal ash.  Carolina Public Press decided to investigate those claims and found more questions than answers.  CPP Managing Editor Frank Taylor spoke with Jeremy Loeb. 

WCQS had a big day in Hendersonville on April 5. The day began with a meeting of the WCQS Community Forum and was capped off that evening with a reception for longtime donors and business supporters.

The Community Forum was held at St. James Episcopal Church. The meeting was well attended. Among the topics discussed was the possibility of a joint project with Carolina Public Press to cover the issues of health care in Western North Carolina.

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