News

Gerry Broome/Associated Press

A series of hearings across the state are giving the public the opportunity to weigh in on coal ash disposal, and policymakers are getting an earful.  Residents have brought up numerous concerns, and some have suggested current health issues could be a result of water contamination from coal ash.  Carolina Public Press decided to investigate those claims and found more questions than answers.  CPP Managing Editor Frank Taylor spoke with Jeremy Loeb. 

WCQS had a big day in Hendersonville on April 5. The day began with a meeting of the WCQS Community Forum and was capped off that evening with a reception for longtime donors and business supporters.

The Community Forum was held at St. James Episcopal Church. The meeting was well attended. Among the topics discussed was the possibility of a joint project with Carolina Public Press to cover the issues of health care in Western North Carolina.

Ashley Rodgers via Time.com

Katharine Hayhoe, a renowned climate scientist and evangelical Christian, will bring her call to action on climate change to Asheville.  Hayhoe has events scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday (4/5 and 4/6).  The trip is sponsored by environmental group MountainTrue (who underwrites on WCQS) and the Creation Care Alliance of WNC.  Hayhoe is director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University.  She was featured on a Showtime documentary and was on Time magazine's 2014 list of Top 100 most influential people in the world.

UNCA Bringing Back Asheville Man's Rare Photographs

Apr 1, 2016
UNC Asheville Archives

A rare collection of photographs taken by Asheville native, the late Isaiah Rice, are being digitized by the University of North Carolina Asheville.  Rice began taking photographs upon his return to Western North Carolina following his service in the U.S. military during World War II.  David Hurand has our story about a man who documented a period marked by segregation and the end of segregation in Asheville.

Additional content:

On this week's Friday @2, join us for Totally Telemann, a program brought to our studios by members of Muses' Delight. The trio of violin, harpsichord and viola da gamba is joined by baroque flutist Kelly Roudabush to explore music by one of the eighteenth century's most prolific composers.

Muse' Delight performs Sunday afternoon as part of the Asheville Baroque Concerts series. On the next Friday @2, they'll perform just for us~!

ashevillenc.gov

Asheville Mayor Esther Manheimer says City Council will consider a resolution on North Carolina House Bill 2 on April 12th expressing "disappointment" in the legislation.  In an interview with WCQS, Manheimer called the bill an overreach and an inappropriate reaction to Charlotte passing an ordinance.

Community Arts Event: Photo+Craft...

Mar 29, 2016

This week Warren Wilson College is the catalyst for a community arts event 3/31-4/3).  Exhibitions, panel discussions,  and much more will examine the intersection of photography and craft at multiple venues, including the campus, downtown Asheville, and the River Arts District.  David Hurand spoke with Warren Wilson College Professor of Photography and Project Director Eric Baden about the first of its kind event, Photo+Craft.

In a Sunday afternoon concert, the Asheville Chamber Music Series will present the Doric String Quartet with pianist Jonathan Biss playing chamber music by Haydn, Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Johannes Brahms.

Dick Kowal spoke with Mary Holmes, board member of the ACMS, about this weekend's concert.

  

Immediate Theatre Company and NC Stage Company present Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," opening Wednesday, April 6th

Dick Kowal spoke with producer Willie Repoley and Director Hans Meyer about this powerful and "entertaining" drama which opened on Broadway in 1962.

Bill Sanders/Asheville Citizen-Times

 The approaching end of the traditional school year will also see a respected and honored Asheville  Elementary school principal leaving his position for a job with North Carolina Outward Bound.  Principal Gordon Grant spoke with David  Hurand.

 

 

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