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The 5th annual Ticket to Ride Summer Raffle is in high gear! Support the programming love and win big! $116 could put you in a 2016 Audi A3 or Audi Q5 from Audi Asheville. Your choice! Purchase your lucky ticket by July 20th and you could also win our Early Bird prize - a Blue Ridge Getaway from the Sourwood Inn and Curtis Wright Outfitters!

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

Updated 6/24 2:30pm:  A bill that would make changes to the way Asheville City Council members are elected is heading to the full North Carolina Senate.  Senate Republican Tom Apodaca introduced the bill that would split Asheville into six districts, scrapping Asheville’s system for at-large elections.  Apodaca says he’s heard from his constituents in South Asheville who say they aren’t being represented on the city council.  No one on the 7 member Council is from that area.  The controversial bill came before the Committee on Redistricting.  The Committee is dominated by

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This week, WCQS gardening expert Alison Arnold talks about some of the plants that have problems flowering this time of year, and why. 

Q (Jeremy): Now that the growing season is well underway is there anything that typically shows up from year to year?

  This weekend marks the opening of the 46th Season of the Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival, with five weeks of performances at Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa and Haywood Arts Regional Theatre in Waynesville.  Festival director Inessa Zaretzky and members of the Tesla String Quartet joined Dick Kowal to talk about the opening night concert of music by Haydn, Dvorak, Mozart, and Caroline Shaw.

  The Southern Appalachian Repertory Theatre in Mars Hill  opens its 42nd Season with Greater Tuna, a play by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard.  Set in Tuna, Texas, the play features only two actors playing all twenty characters. Bill Greg, Executive Producing Director of SART, talked with Dick Kowal about the play and about the following production, The Belle of Amherst.

  Therapeutic musician Robin Russell Gaiser celebrates the release of her new book, Musical Morphine: Transforming Pain One Note at a Time with a book launch party Sunday at 5 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville.  She spoke with Dick Kowal about the book and her work with chronically, critically, and terminally ill patients. 

Open Air Brevard 2016

Jun 15, 2016

Every summer the Brevard Music Center and Summer Festival brings together renowned soloists and conductors, dedicated faculty from leading orchestras, and talented students from across the country for learning and world-class music-making. Join us each week for memorable concerts from the 80-year-old festival on Open Air Brevard, Tuesday evenings at 7 and Wednesday mornings at 10 here on WCQS.

We all knew the day was coming, now it's almost here! After 42 years as host and creative force behind A Prairie Home Companion, Garrison Keillor will hang up his red shoes July 2nd. We know you'll want to tune your radio and listen during your Independence Day weekend celebrations.

If you'd like to take the celebration up a notch, you can host your own Listening Party. Our friends at A Prairie Home Companion have assembled a Listening Party Starter Kit, complete with:

Hope Street Group

With the state’s next Moral Monday gathering scheduled to be held in Sylva this coming Monday, WCQS’s Davin Eldridge spoke with area school teacher and outspoken member of the North Carolina Association of Educators, John DeVille, who will be addressing the current state of public education as an event speaker. DeVille charges that since 2010, the Republican majority has taken a number of steps to dismantle the state’s public school system.

 

  The fifth annual Asheville Percussion Festival returns June 17-19, featuring teaching artists from around the world, dancers, singers, wellness workshops, and lots and lots of drumming. Founder and rhythm ambassador River Guerguerian talks with Dick Kowal about this year's festival at 1:06, following NPR news headlines.

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In her commentary this week, WCQS gardening expert Alison Arnold takes us through some of the common problems we see in our gardens this time of year. 

Q (Jeremy): It’s June and while it’s still early in the growing season many landscape plants have grown enough for us to know whether they are healthy or not.. what type of problems are you seeing or commonly see in the garden at this time?

The results are in from Tuesday's primary election in North Carolina.  Voter turnout was low, and the election produced few surprises.  But there is no shortage of interesting storylines to emerge, as North Carolina appears heads towards a November election that's expected to be extremely competitive.  For what we learned on Tuesday, and what to expect this November, I spoke with Dr. Chris Cooper, head of the Department of Political Science and Public Affairs at Western Carolina University.

Voters in western North Carolina made choices in several Congressional races Tuesday.  In the closest race, Democrats Rick Bryson and Tom Hill battled in the 11th District.  Bryson just barely eked out a win, 50.75 % of the vote to Hill's 49.25%.  The vote count was 9,636 to 9,351.  Bryson will face incumbent Republican Congressman Mark Meadows in November. 

North Carolina voters may be surprised about today's primary election, considering they just voted months ago.  But because of several court rulings, a second primary is taking place today.  And while turnout is expected to be low, the stakes are high.  Congressional races and the ideological split of the state Supreme Court are up for grabs.  For what to look for in Tuesday's primary, I spoke with Dr. Chris Cooper, head of the Department of Political Science and Public Affairs at Western Carolina University. 

The North Carolina Senate has passed on first reading its version of the budget by a vote of 33-15.  Included in the budget is a plan sponsored by Hendersonville Republican Senator Tom Apodaca to cap tuition to $500 per semester at select universities, including Western Carolina University.  WCU was originally among 5 schools, 3 of them historically black colleges and universities that would be affected.  But after an outcry from HBCU alumni, the 3 HBCUs were removed from the plan, leaving only WCU and UNC Pembroke.  That amendment passed overwhelmingly.  I spoke with Western Carolina Profe

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