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There is perhaps no other place in America known for its autumn leaves than the mountains of Western North Carolina. The generations have brought to the region countless so-called “leaf-lookers” enthralled by their fiery shades of yellow and red come mid-October. Even this year, when area biologists are expecting fall leaves to be duller, and less-vibrant, all local economists can see on the horizon is the color of money for the mountains.

Davin Eldridge

Once news of a ruptured gasoline pipeline in Alabama broke earlier this month, people throughout the southeastern United States immediately rushed out to their local gas stations to stock up. More than 250,000 gallons of fuel is estimated to have been leaked, and the panic that ensued from the incident caused fuel shortages at many area gas stations—and Western North Carolina was by no means immune to the shortages, nor the public’s response to it.

Fall is officially here, marking the end of a very hot summer here in Western North Carolina and across the country.  July went into the record books as the hottest month.  Along with the scorching temperatures came floods in Louisiana, and the threat of Zika in Florida.  Extreme climate events in the Southeast that not only impacted the environment – but human health.    

Keith Woods, NPR Vice President for Diversity in News and Operations, who leads the development of National Public Radio’s vision and strategy for diversity, and writes regularly on race and the media, will give a free public talk on Dog Whistles, Diversity and Election 2016 at 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville's Humanities Lecture Hall on Thursday, October 6. This event is presented in partnership by UNC Asheville's Center for Diversity Education, the university's Department of Mass Communication, and WCQS.

On the Walls at WCQS: A selection of the Isaiah Rice Photograph Collection, titled "The Way We Were," will be on display at WCQS, starting October 7, 2016. The photos depict Asheville's African-American community from the 1950's to the 1970s. WCQS will host an an opening reception at 5 p.m. on Friday, October 7. The photos will be on display through November at WCQS, located at 73 Broadway. Visitors are welcome Monday through Friday, 9 to 5, except holidays. 

You did it! WCQS listeners raised $200,000 for the Fall Membership Drive by September 21st for uninterrupted programming. It was a terrific show of community support, and every pledge to WCQS was matched by generous sponsors to benefit health, education and income partner programs of the United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County.

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As Charlotte reels in the aftermath of the shooting death of a black man by a police officer, an Asheville civil rights activist paid a visit to WCQS to offer his thoughts.  Robert Zachary last visited WCQS prior to the 50th anniversary of the March on Selma.  Zachary grew up in Anniston, Alabama and witnessed and took part in some of the major events of the civil rights movement.  Police shootings of black men and the resulting protests have hit closer to home recently, with high-profile shootings of a man in Raleigh, Asheville, and most recently in Charlotte.  In our hour-long conversat

North Carolina is shaping up to be one of if the not the chief battleground state in this year's presidential election.  And a new poll from the New York Times only adds more credence to that.

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For millions of people across the United States, the beginning of their day starts at a bus stop.

 

Gas Stations Seeing Shortages Across The Region

Sep 20, 2016

Gas stations across North Carolina are seeing shortages following a pipeline leak.  But Triple-A says the rupture is not necessarily the cause of that.  It’s the crush of drivers filling up that is causing stations to run out of gas says Triple-A Carolinas spokeswoman Tiffany Wright.  Her message is don’t panic – there’s enough gas to go around.

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North Carolina Gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper paid a visit to western North Carolina on Saturday.  The Democratic Attorney General addressed dozens of Democrats at the Fairview home of state Rep. John Ager in what was billed as a "candidates meet and greet."  WCQS’s Jeremy Loeb was there and has this report.

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NC Gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper paid a visit to Fairview on Saturday.  The Democratic Attorney General addressed dozens of Democrats at the home of state Rep. John Ager in what was billed as a "candidates meet and greet."  He was scheduled to attend a fundraiser later in the day.  

Cooper started his remarks talking about public education.  "People are hungry for leaders who truly believe in public education and will do something about it instead of just talking about it."

Juergen Frank

  The Asheville Symphony opens it new season Saturday evening in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. The program is called Tchasing Tchaikovsky, an all-Tchaikovsky concert featuring a performance of his violin concerto by Jennifer Koh.

Ms Koh and Daniel Meyer, music director and conductor, joined Josh Jourdan to talk about opening night.

http://www.ashevillesymphony.org

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 The Southern Conference will make a faster decision on whether to pull championships out of North Carolina.

The NCAA announced earlier this week it will move championships out of North Carolina because of a state law that requires transgender people to use the bathroom that matches their birth certificate.

The Atlantic Coast Conference decided Wednesday to pull the football championship out of Charlotte this year for the same reason.

Southern Conference Commissioner John Iamarino told local media earlier the issue would be discussed in October.

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Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton chose Greensboro as the site to resume her campaign after a pneumonia diagnosis forced her to take a few days off. The crowd of around 2,000 people at a University of North Carolina at Greensboro campus building cheered as she took the stage. James Brown's famous song "I Feel Good" played as a musical answer on how her health is holding up.

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